LION’S HEAD MAKER

Loong walk past the process of making the lion head, from the bamboo frame to the complete lion dance head which is completely wrapped in plastic cover. Wan Seng Hang Dragon & Lion Arts was founded in 1986. It started with founder Siew Ho Phiew learning his lion dance traits in China, and decided to make his own lion dance head by opening a shop. “I learned Fuo Shan lion dance first from my two early masters. Later, I also learned He Shan Sar Ping lion dance from Master Chen Xiao Qi. This has given me a chance to explore further the intricate parts of a lion head and have a better grasp of the two lion head merits and demerits. My lion head making skills is further developed as a result.” said Siew. Besides lion head, Wan Seng Hang also makes dragon and Qi Lin heads. The intricate lion heads are brought to life in the industrial area of Subang 2 at the Wan Seng Hang workshop. Every year, the team at Wan Seng Hang can produce around 500 lion heads per year with some being exported to Asia and around the world. WSH produces two styles of southern lion heads, the Fut San and Hok San, with both originating from Guangdong province, Both varieties can be differentiated by the shape of the horn and mouth, and overall stance of the head. The price of the lion head varies, from RM2,000 to about RM4,000 and it takes the team about one week to make one whole lion head come to life. photo adib rawi yahya

Wan Seng Hang supervisor Wong Siong Loong shows the process by feeding rattan stems through a special cutting tool to produce slimmer pieces. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong then shapes the rattan by hand and secure with adhesive tape to make the lion head frame commonly used for lion dance. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong then shapes the rattan by hand and secure with adhesive tape to make the lion head frame commonly used for lion dance. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong make a final check after shapes the rattan by hand and secure with adhesive tape to make the lion head frame commonly used for lion dance. photo adib rawi yahya

A woman is applying bamboo paper and gauze to a lion head frame to strengthen it. Then she takes it out to be dried by the sun at her home. photo adib rawi yahya

A Wan Seng Hang worker takes the lion head frames that has been applied with white bamboo paper from the woman’s house using a pick-up truck. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong hold the lion head frames that has been applied with white bamboo paper to the back of his shop to hang before paint it. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong hold the lion head frames that has been applied with white bamboo paper to the back of his shop to hang before paint it. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong make a final check the lion head frames that has been applied with white bamboo paper before hang it. photo adib rawi yahya

After picking up the lion heads, Master Ruey Seng Ching then draws the design of the lion head using pencil and chalk following the customer’s requirement. photo adib rawi yahya

A Wan Seng Hang worker then applies gum on parts of the lion head where they would apply stickers later. photo adib rawi yahya

A Wan Seng Hang worker then applies stickers on parts of the lion head. photo adib rawi yahya

After the sticker is applied, Master Ruey then paints the lion head using colours derive from standard paint. photo adib rawi yahya

After the sticker is applied, Master Ruey then paints the lion head using colours derive from standard paint. photo adib rawi yahya

After the sticker is applied, Master Ruey then paints the lion head using colours derive from standard paint. photo adib rawi yahya

After the sticker is applied, Master Ruey then paints the lion head using colours derive from standard paint. photo adib rawi yahya

Once the paint has dried, a worker then applies lacquer onto the lion head to ensure that there is a protective layer and the colours stay vibrant and shiny for a long time. photo adib rawi yahya

Once the paint has dried, a worker then applies lacquer onto the lion head to ensure that there is a protective layer and the colours stay vibrant and shiny for a long time. photo adib rawi yahya

Once the paint has dried, a worker then applies lacquer onto the lion head to ensure that there is a protective layer and the colours stay vibrant and shiny for a long time. photo adib rawi yahya

After applying the lacquer, Loong then applies the fur, ribbon and bulbous fur balls onto certain parts of the lion head and shapes the fur as a final touch-up before it is sold to customers. photo adib rawi yahya

After applying the lacquer, Loong then applies the fur, ribbon and bulbous fur balls onto certain parts of the lion head and shapes the fur as a final touch-up before it is sold to customers. photo adib rawi yahya

Loong then puts the completed lion heads to one side, while waiting for customers to come and pick up the lion head. The lion head is wrap with a plastic cover. photo adib rawi yahya

For the overseas customers, Loong put the lion head into a sturdy box with extra protective layers so that customers will get the lion head in pristine condition. photo adib rawi yahya

For the overseas customers, Loong put the lion head into a sturdy box with extra protective layers so that customers will get the lion head in pristine condition. photo adib rawi yahya

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